Film recounts firefighter crew of Apache women

Film recounts firefighter crew of Apache women

27 March 2011

published bywww.azstarnet.com


USA — Tucsonan Sande Zeig, who served as the Loft Cinema’s director and programmer from 2002 to 2006, has directed an hourlong documentary that will air on KUAT at 9 p.m. Monday.

 

Zeig’s film, “Apache 8” – which was sponsored in part by the University of Arizona’s Hanson Film Institute and produced by the institute’s director, Vicky Westover – tells the story of a wildland firefighter crew that consists of White Mountain Apache women. Zeig blends archival footage with interviews with four members from different generations, letting them recount their stories as they traveled the state and country battling wildfires.

 

The women describe the hardships they’ve faced on the job as well as the senses of pride and kinship they received.

 

“When I started making the film, I thought it was going to be about this all-women crew, ‘Apache 8,’ but it became something else, something more,” said Zeig via email. “I discovered, during the making of the film, that each of the women we featured have all excelled and been honored with community and national recognition. I had no idea when we started.”


Film recounts firefighter crew of Apache women

Film recounts firefighter crew of Apache women

27 March 2011

published bywww.azstarnet.com


USA — Tucsonan Sande Zeig, who served as the Loft Cinema’s director and programmer from 2002 to 2006, has directed an hourlong documentary that will air on KUAT at 9 p.m. Monday.

 

Zeig’s film, “Apache 8” – which was sponsored in part by the University of Arizona’s Hanson Film Institute and produced by the institute’s director, Vicky Westover – tells the story of a wildland firefighter crew that consists of White Mountain Apache women. Zeig blends archival footage with interviews with four members from different generations, letting them recount their stories as they traveled the state and country battling wildfires.

 

The women describe the hardships they’ve faced on the job as well as the senses of pride and kinship they received.

 

“When I started making the film, I thought it was going to be about this all-women crew, ‘Apache 8,’ but it became something else, something more,” said Zeig via email. “I discovered, during the making of the film, that each of the women we featured have all excelled and been honored with community and national recognition. I had no idea when we started.”


Fire awareness for women

Fire awareness for women

27 April 2011

published bywww.begadistrictnews.com.au


Australia — A DOZEN ladies gathered at the Cobargo Fire Shed recently for the Bega Valley’s first Women’s Fire Awareness Workshop.

Fire mitigation officer Garry Cooper and community safety assistant Robin Philp have been aware that when talk turns to bushfire, it seems to become “men’s business”.

However, it is often women who are at home during the day, sometimes without a car, looking after children or elderly relatives and they have been left out of the loop when it comes to being prepared for a bushfire.

The workshop was designed to break down some barriers and give women the tools they need to make plans and decisions when a serious fire turns up in their neighbourhood.

Women do not have to be fire fighters – they just need to know what needs to be done.

Robyn Reynolds, who is a long term member of the Pambula Rural Fire Service Brigade, opened the workshop by sharing her experiences as a women fire fighter and was able to give the ladies plenty of practical advice.

The workshop covered topics such as what equipment might be needed, appropriate clothing, how to manage the fire pump, preparation and on going maintenance of the home and importantly, establishing neighbourhood networks and where to get reliable information during a fire event.

The men were on hand to cook the lunch; the food was great and they also helped with some practical demonstrations with fire and equipment.

Follow up neighbourhood meetings have been requested by the ladies so that planning and sharing local knowledge can continue.

Community safety assistants will carry out home inspections where requested and help set up a local networks.

With information and continued support these women will be able to prepare for the fire season with a well thought out Bush Fire Survival Plan and be confident about making the right decisions for their family and their home.

Women across the Bega Valley are encouraged to get in touch with Bega Fire Control if they would like a workshop in their neighbourhood.


Fire awareness for women

Fire awareness for women

27 April 2011

published bywww.begadistrictnews.com.au


Australia — A DOZEN ladies gathered at the Cobargo Fire Shed recently for the Bega Valley’s first Women’s Fire Awareness Workshop.

Fire mitigation officer Garry Cooper and community safety assistant Robin Philp have been aware that when talk turns to bushfire, it seems to become “men’s business”.

However, it is often women who are at home during the day, sometimes without a car, looking after children or elderly relatives and they have been left out of the loop when it comes to being prepared for a bushfire.

The workshop was designed to break down some barriers and give women the tools they need to make plans and decisions when a serious fire turns up in their neighbourhood.

Women do not have to be fire fighters – they just need to know what needs to be done.

Robyn Reynolds, who is a long term member of the Pambula Rural Fire Service Brigade, opened the workshop by sharing her experiences as a women fire fighter and was able to give the ladies plenty of practical advice.

The workshop covered topics such as what equipment might be needed, appropriate clothing, how to manage the fire pump, preparation and on going maintenance of the home and importantly, establishing neighbourhood networks and where to get reliable information during a fire event.

The men were on hand to cook the lunch; the food was great and they also helped with some practical demonstrations with fire and equipment.

Follow up neighbourhood meetings have been requested by the ladies so that planning and sharing local knowledge can continue.

Community safety assistants will carry out home inspections where requested and help set up a local networks.

With information and continued support these women will be able to prepare for the fire season with a well thought out Bush Fire Survival Plan and be confident about making the right decisions for their family and their home.

Women across the Bega Valley are encouraged to get in touch with Bega Fire Control if they would like a workshop in their neighbourhood.


Women in Central Sulawesi help promote REDD program

Women in Central Sulawesi help promote REDD program

27 April 2011

published bywww.thejakartapost.com


Indonesia — Women in Central Sulawesi are being hailed for their role in helping to promote the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) program, as they have reportedly been trying to stop environmental damage
from forest exploitation. Central Sulawesi REDD working group member Mutmainah Korona said women’s positions in society should no longer be overlooked, including with the implementation of the REDD program in 2012.

“Women’s involvement in decision-making is crucial,” Mutmainah told The Jakarta Post recently.

This is very important because there is a close connection between the forest and women, she said. The United Nations-initated REDD program is an effort to create financial value for the carbon stored in forests, offering incentives for developing countries to reduce emissions from forested lands and invest in low-carbon paths to sustainable development.

On its official website, it is stated that deforestation and forest degradation through agricultural expansion, conversion to pastureland, infrastructure development, destructive logging, fires etc. account for nearly 20 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions.

The program currently has 29 partner countries spanning Africa, Asia and the Pacific and Latin America, of which 13, including Indonesia, are receiving support for their activities. The other 12 countries are Bolivia, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands, Tanzania, Vietnam and Zambia.

In North Lore and Lore Piore districts in Poso regency, women are reportedly refraining from felling wood in the forest. They use nipa palm leaves to weave into mats, tree branches for firewood and collect honey, which they sell to meet their family’s daily needs. According to Mutmainah, who is also director of the South Sulawesi Women and Children’s Care group, women should be involved in the implementation of REDD including with decision-making and information access.

“At this stage, women must be heeded and not only regarded as a complementary object,” she said.


Women in Central Sulawesi help promote REDD program

Women in Central Sulawesi help promote REDD program

27 April 2011

published bywww.thejakartapost.com


Indonesia — Women in Central Sulawesi are being hailed for their role in helping to promote the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) program, as they have reportedly been trying to stop environmental damage
from forest exploitation. Central Sulawesi REDD working group member Mutmainah Korona said women’s positions in society should no longer be overlooked, including with the implementation of the REDD program in 2012.

“Women’s involvement in decision-making is crucial,” Mutmainah told The Jakarta Post recently.

This is very important because there is a close connection between the forest and women, she said. The United Nations-initated REDD program is an effort to create financial value for the carbon stored in forests, offering incentives for developing countries to reduce emissions from forested lands and invest in low-carbon paths to sustainable development.

On its official website, it is stated that deforestation and forest degradation through agricultural expansion, conversion to pastureland, infrastructure development, destructive logging, fires etc. account for nearly 20 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions.

The program currently has 29 partner countries spanning Africa, Asia and the Pacific and Latin America, of which 13, including Indonesia, are receiving support for their activities. The other 12 countries are Bolivia, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, the Philippines, the Solomon Islands, Tanzania, Vietnam and Zambia.

In North Lore and Lore Piore districts in Poso regency, women are reportedly refraining from felling wood in the forest. They use nipa palm leaves to weave into mats, tree branches for firewood and collect honey, which they sell to meet their family’s daily needs. According to Mutmainah, who is also director of the South Sulawesi Women and Children’s Care group, women should be involved in the implementation of REDD including with decision-making and information access.

“At this stage, women must be heeded and not only regarded as a complementary object,” she said.


Women in Central Sulawesi help promote REDD program

Firery women make their towns safer

19 November 2011

published by http://www.adelaidenow.com.au


Australia — ARMED with practical skills for fire fighting, rural women are better prepared to protect their families.

The South Australian Country Fire Service, with the State Government and the community, developed the award-winning education program called Firery Women after the devastating Wangary fire on the Lower Eyre Peninsula. Nine people died, mostly women and children.

Community education and public warnings manager Fiona Dunstan said research including in-depth interviews with survivors showed rural women were particularly vulnerable.

“Women were often left on the farm,” she said.

“The men would get on their fire trucks and they’d be gone for the day. More often than not, the women and children were left at home with the fire.

“There were some instances of the men ringing and saying ‘Just take the kids and go, I’m really frightened for you, just go’. Others were left at home with no idea how to start pumps, no idea how to squirt water, because that was typically the role of the men in the household.”

Mother of two Hayley Anderson, from Endeavour Heights near Port Lincoln, said she’d always imagined she’d bundle the family in the car as soon as she saw smoke or flames.

That was until she heard about the tragic death of Judith Griffith, 59, and her grandchildren, Jack, 2, and Star Borlase, 3, who left too late.

“It so easily could have been us,” she said. “It’s quite frightening when you see it that way.”

Mrs Anderson was so impressed with her first Firey Women workshop that she took her 12-year-old daughter, mother and mother-in-law along at the next opportunity.

“All this sort of stuff you leave to men generally is what Firey Women teaches you,” Mrs Anderson said.

“It’s really hands on. You get in there and you do actually work a pump, you hold on to a hose while the water is gushing out and you realise how difficult it is to control it and how strong it is. You don’t want to come across that sort of stuff and have no idea of what you’re doing.”

Firey Women has won the state final of the 2011 Australian Safer Communities Awards. The national winner will be announced in Canberra next month.


Women in Central Sulawesi help promote REDD program

Firery women make their towns safer

19 November 2011

published by http://www.adelaidenow.com.au


Australia — ARMED with practical skills for fire fighting, rural women are better prepared to protect their families.

The South Australian Country Fire Service, with the State Government and the community, developed the award-winning education program called Firery Women after the devastating Wangary fire on the Lower Eyre Peninsula. Nine people died, mostly women and children.

Community education and public warnings manager Fiona Dunstan said research including in-depth interviews with survivors showed rural women were particularly vulnerable.

“Women were often left on the farm,” she said.

“The men would get on their fire trucks and they’d be gone for the day. More often than not, the women and children were left at home with the fire.

“There were some instances of the men ringing and saying ‘Just take the kids and go, I’m really frightened for you, just go’. Others were left at home with no idea how to start pumps, no idea how to squirt water, because that was typically the role of the men in the household.”

Mother of two Hayley Anderson, from Endeavour Heights near Port Lincoln, said she’d always imagined she’d bundle the family in the car as soon as she saw smoke or flames.

That was until she heard about the tragic death of Judith Griffith, 59, and her grandchildren, Jack, 2, and Star Borlase, 3, who left too late.

“It so easily could have been us,” she said. “It’s quite frightening when you see it that way.”

Mrs Anderson was so impressed with her first Firey Women workshop that she took her 12-year-old daughter, mother and mother-in-law along at the next opportunity.

“All this sort of stuff you leave to men generally is what Firey Women teaches you,” Mrs Anderson said.

“It’s really hands on. You get in there and you do actually work a pump, you hold on to a hose while the water is gushing out and you realise how difficult it is to control it and how strong it is. You don’t want to come across that sort of stuff and have no idea of what you’re doing.”

Firey Women has won the state final of the 2011 Australian Safer Communities Awards. The national winner will be announced in Canberra next month.


Natural disasters increase violence against women

Natural disasters increase violence against women

08 March 2012

published by www.abc.net.au


Australia — A new report shows women suffer domestic violence in the wake of natural disasters.

Australians have a 1 in 6 estimated lifetime exposure to natural disaster and the after effects, according to this ground breaking report, will include increases in relationship violence.

This research, from the Women’s Health Goulburn North East organisation, a specialist women’s health service for the Goulburn Valley and north east Victoria, uses case studies showing violence against women increased following the Victoria bushfires, a disturbing outcome that mirrors overseas experience where violence against women is characteristic of post-disaster recovery.

It’s the first Australian research to identify and examine family violence after the Black Saturday bushfires

Chief researcher, Deborah Parkinson says while previous Australian research has looked at what happens in disaster-recovery phases, none focuses on the experience of women in regard to violence.

“In the tumult of disaster recovery, relationship violence is often ignored, unrecognised and unrecorded,” she says.

“This research presents the case for clear-eyed recognition of increased violence against women in the aftermath of disaster and a disaster response that protects women and offers options, while proactively recognising the increased needs of men, to prevent family violence.”

According to Ms Parkinson the factors that lead to violence are understandable.

“Stress levels are high, perpetrators may have been ‘heroes’ and, following a disaster, men are often unemployed and sometimes suicidal.

“Support services are over-burdened with primary and fire-related needs in the aftermath of a disaster and this serves to exacerbate a willingness to overlook violence against women.”

Details of the study will be outlined at the Identifying the Hidden Disaster Conference in Melbourne tomorrow.


Natural disasters increase violence against women

Natural disasters increase violence against women

08 March 2012

published by www.abc.net.au


Australia — A new report shows women suffer domestic violence in the wake of natural disasters.

Australians have a 1 in 6 estimated lifetime exposure to natural disaster and the after effects, according to this ground breaking report, will include increases in relationship violence.

This research, from the Women’s Health Goulburn North East organisation, a specialist women’s health service for the Goulburn Valley and north east Victoria, uses case studies showing violence against women increased following the Victoria bushfires, a disturbing outcome that mirrors overseas experience where violence against women is characteristic of post-disaster recovery.

It’s the first Australian research to identify and examine family violence after the Black Saturday bushfires

Chief researcher, Deborah Parkinson says while previous Australian research has looked at what happens in disaster-recovery phases, none focuses on the experience of women in regard to violence.

“In the tumult of disaster recovery, relationship violence is often ignored, unrecognised and unrecorded,” she says.

“This research presents the case for clear-eyed recognition of increased violence against women in the aftermath of disaster and a disaster response that protects women and offers options, while proactively recognising the increased needs of men, to prevent family violence.”

According to Ms Parkinson the factors that lead to violence are understandable.

“Stress levels are high, perpetrators may have been ‘heroes’ and, following a disaster, men are often unemployed and sometimes suicidal.

“Support services are over-burdened with primary and fire-related needs in the aftermath of a disaster and this serves to exacerbate a willingness to overlook violence against women.”

Details of the study will be outlined at the Identifying the Hidden Disaster Conference in Melbourne tomorrow.