Bushfires in Southeast Australia

Bushfires in Southeast Australia

19 March 2009


East of Churchill, Victoria, a burn scar left by one of the deadly Australian bushfires in February 2009 sprawls across the landscape in this image captured by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite on 14 March 2009. The image combines visible light with near-infrared light, and although the resulting false-color image doesn’t look like a natural photo, it makes the burned areas (charcoal-brown) stand out better from unburned vegetation (red) and areas where vegetation is naturally sparse or dormant (beige). The burn scar is brown is some places and more charcoal-colored in others. The differences could be because the severity of the fire was different from place to place, but it could also be due to differences in the type of vegetation that burned and the characteristics of the underlying soil. According to news reports, this fire resulted in nearly two dozen deaths, and it appears to have resulted from arson.

TERRA
14 March 2009

(source: earth observatory)

Wilson’s Promontory National Park, located at the southern tip of Victoria, Australia, was one of many areas scorched by large bushfires in February 2009. The Cathedral Fire, which was sparked by lightning on 8 February, burned an estimated 25,200 hectares (62,271 acres) in the park before it was fully contained on 14 March, the day this image was captured by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA’s Terra satellite.

TERRA
14 March 2009

(source: earth observatory)

The image combines visible light with near-infrared light; the resulting false-color image makes burned areas more obvious (charcoal-brown). Unburned vegetation is red, and areas where vegetation is naturally sparse or dormant are beige. Beaches and sandy spots are nearly as white as the clouds. North of the park boundary (upper left), the landscape is beige and light red, a rural-agricultural area where people have cleared the natural vegetation.

The park has a wide variety of habitats, including beaches, tidal mud flats, grass-covered dunes, marshes and swamps, and upland forests. The burn scar is darker in some places in others, which could be because the amount of burning there was more severe, but it could also be due to differences in the type of vegetation that burned and the characteristics of the soil. For example, the burn scar appears very dark in a swampy area inland of Five Mile Beach.

The park was closed for several weeks while managers assessed the damage and made sure it would be safe for visitors to return. Some areas will be reopened to the public beginning 21 March.

See also latest news on the media page:

  • Royal commission into Victoria bushfires begins (published by www.theaustralian.news.com.au, 18 March 2009)

  • Bushfire risk to water quality lingers (published by www.abc.net.au, 17 March 2009)

  • Tourism push for bushfire areas (published by www.theage.com.au, 17 March 2009)

  • Bushfire-destroyed areas cleanup starts (published by news.smh.com.au, 17 March 2009)

  • Bushfire-devastated Kinglake reopens (published by news.smh.com.au, 17 March 2009)

  • Authorities monitor waterways in wake of fires (published by www.abc.net.au, 16 March 2009)

  • Tougher building rules for bushfire areas (published by www.abc.net.au, 16 March 2009)

  • Bushfire area hit by landslides (published by www.theaustralian.news.com.au, 15 March 2009)

  • Australia’s last forest fire out (published by www.radionetherlands.nl, 14 March 2009)


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