Bush fire management is important for biodiversity


Bush fire management is important for biodiversity

23 November 2012

published by www.newera.com.na


Namibia– EVEN if there is worldwide acceptance that proactive burning is essential in preventing socio-environmental fire threats, there is still debate about which fire regimes are most appropriate in achieving this.
Because nature is so complex and is infinitely changing, there will always be uncertainties and risk with regard to the outcomes of various planned fire regimes.

Past burning practices by indigenous or native Namibians were primarily intended towards maximizing animal, food and plant resources, I would presume.
This burning is integral to the upkeep and maintenance of our flora and fauna as well as unique landscapes. The recent outbreak of fires in and around the vicinity of Windhoek does not seem to comply with contemporary fire regimes, especially the present trend of extensive fires in the area.
I do not know the cause of these bush fires, but I surely know that it has a negative impact on the natural environment and global climatic conditions.
Some components of the biota (the combined flora and fauna of a region), such as fungi, native grasses, herbs and some invertebrates benefit immensely from fires while others are severely disadvantaged.

This shows therefore that there is no one or combination of fire regimes that benefits all ecosystems or organisms. There is however substantial evidence that the extent and frequency of these high intensity fires around Windhoek completely changed the ecological systems and came at a great cost to some farmers and competing land users.
Who knows? There might be some endangered plant and animal species in these areas. The best management regime that needs to be adopted across Namibia is computer simulations modelling (FireScape-SWTAS), which is effective in defining the degree of prescribed burning and the future impacts of unplanned fires on management objectives.The failure was in the forest areas.Advertisement

Following a 10-year strategy, ACT fire managers have created a mosaic across the landscape of different fuel levels, burning at every opportunity.

But forests have been too wet to burn this spring and the past two summers.

Read more:http://www.canberratimes.com.au/environment/red-alert-for-high-risk-of-fires-20121118-29koa.html#ixzz2CmafUgo3
 The failure was in the forest areas.Advertisement

Following a 10-year strategy, ACT fire managers have created a mosaic across the landscape of different fuel levels, burning at every opportunity.

But forests have been too wet to burn this spring and the past two summers.

Read more:http://www.canberratimes.com.au/environment/red-alert-for-high-risk-of-fires-20121118-29koa.html#ixzz2CmafUgo3
 The failure was in the forest areas.Advertisement

Following a 10-year strategy, ACT fire managers have created a mosaic across the landscape of different fuel levels, burning at every opportunity.

But forests have been too wet to burn this spring and the past two summers.

Read more:http://www.canberratimes.com.au/environment/red-alert-for-high-risk-of-fires-20121118-29koa.html#ixzz2CmafUgo3
 Two summers of unprecedented rain and unusually cool temperatures have left a large fuel load of grass and unburnt forest areas in and around Canberra.

A network of 500 fire trails and strategic burns along the north-west urban edge, heavy grazing and extra grass slashing will create a fortress for the territory which forecasters say faces a higher than average risk this summer.

After a fire-fuelled tornado in January 2003 killed four Canberrans and frightened thousands more, CSIRO fire expert Phil Cheney told the subsequent inquiry the fire’s penetration into urban areas under extreme conditions did not reflect a failure of fuel management on the urban interface.

Read more:http://www.canberratimes.com.au/environment/red-alert-for-high-risk-of-fires-20121118-29koa.html#ixzz2CmaXNjum
 The failure was in the forest areas.Advertisement

Following a 10-year strategy, ACT fire managers have created a mosaic across the landscape of different fuel levels, burning at every opportunity.

But forests have been too wet to burn this spring and the past two summers.

Read more:http://www.canberratimes.com.au/environment/red-alert-for-high-risk-of-fires-20121118-29koa.html#ixzz2CmafUgo3
 


 

 

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