EGU General Assembly 2019. Vienna, Austria

,

At EGU 2019, a dedicated session addressing vegetationfires will be held:

BG1.57/AS4.45/NH1.38
Fire, carbon, climate and humans across space and time (co-organized)

Convener: Sander Veraverbeke

Co-conveners: Alysha Coppola, Angelica Feurdean, Gitta Lasslop, Carrie Masiello

Fire is a global phenomenon influencing ecosystem functioning, carbon stocks and fluxes, and atmospheric composition, with large impacts on human health, safety and economy. The relative importance of climate, vegetation and humans as drivers of fire activity varies across spatial and temporal scales. Multiscale and interdisciplinary assessments of fire behavior are required to understand global climate-fire feedbacks, as well as regional interactions between vegetation and humans, and fire.

Fire influences the global carbon cycle among others through its carbon emissions and post-fire ecosystem carbon sequestration. In addition, black carbon (also known as pyrogenic carbon, charcoal, soot) is a crucial component in the carbon cycle, yet uncertainties remain regarding sizes, losses and fluxes between land, rivers, oceans and atmosphere.

The aim of this session is to improve the understanding of interactions between fire, vegetation, carbon, climate and humans. We invite contributions developing or using remote sensing datasets, in situ observations, charcoal records, laboratory experiments and modeling approaches. We welcome studies that help to improve our understanding of (1) the relative importance of climate, vegetation and humans on fire occurrence across spatial and temporal scales (2) the impacts of fire on vegetation, atmosphere and society, (3) feedbacks between fire, vegetation and climate, and (4) the role of fire in the carbon cycle, with special focus on the transfer of black carbon and other fire markers from terrestrial ecosystems to aquatic environments, and their biogeochemical fate in these environments.

Details and Portal for Abstract Submission (Deadline: 10 January 2019):

Joint Meetings: UNISDR WFAG, ILC and Brazilian Conference Committee for 7th IWFC


Joint Meetings
UNISDR Wildland Fire Advisory Group (WFAG)
International Liaison Committee (ILC) and the Brazilian Conference Organizing Committee
for the 7th International Wildland Fire Conference
Global Fire Monitoring Center (GFMC), Freiburg, Germany
12-14 October 2018

 

One year ahead of the 7th International Wildland Fire Conference (IWFC-7) (Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, 28 October – 1 November 2019) the IWFC-6 International Liaison Committee (ILC), the Brazilian Conference Organizing Committee and the members of the UNISDR Wildland Fire Advisory Group (WFAG) met to discuss the roadmap 2018-2019.

The meeting was held at the UNISDR International Day for Disaster Reduction 2018

 

 

 

POSTDOC IN HIGH LATITUDE FEEDBACKS BETWEEN CLIMATE, FIRE, VEGETATION AND CARBON


Original posting at:

https://www.vu.nl/nl/werken-bij-de-vu/vacatures/2018/18273postdochighlatitudefeesbacksbetweenclimate.aspx

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam is a leading, innovative and growing university that is at the heart of society and actively contributes to new developments in teaching and research. Our university has ten faculties which span a wide range of disciplines, as well as several institutes, foundations, research centres, and support services. Its campus is located in the fastest-growing economic region in the Netherlands (the Zuidas district of Amsterdam), and provides work for over 4,500 staff and scientific education for more than 23,000 students.

At the department of Earth Sciences, we study our dynamic planet from nano- to planetary scale. We quantify the key cycles and interactions in system Earth over timescales from seconds to millions of years by combining fieldwork, lab work and computer simulations. By bringing to bear our fundamental understanding of system Earth and our fresh curiosity we conduct research that is relevant for today’s societal challenges including sustainability, climate change and natural hazards. The department’s research facilities are regarded as outstanding, while the department’s international focus fosters national and international collaboration, both contributing to high-quality and high-impact research outcomes.

Project 
This vacancy is part of a prestigious Vidi project funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The project will combine field work, remote sensing and statistical modeling to study interactions between climate, vegetation and fire in boreal and arctic systems.

Tasks
The postdoc will investigate feedbacks between climate, fire, vegetation and carbon in high latitude ecosystems based on field, remote sensing and modeling approaches. The geographic scope will encompass the entire circumpolar arctic-boreal biomes, and the applicant should therefore be able to handle big datasets efficiently. The applicant should be able to deal with logistical issues and challenging conditions for field campaigns in Siberia. The applicant will closely collaborate with other team members and colleagues, among others from NASA’s Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment. The research should lead to peer-reviewed publications. The applicant will present the results at national and international conferences, and contribute to teaching courses.

Requirements
• PhD in earth, ecological or environmental sciences or related field but with proven interest in earth sciences and/or (spatial) ecology;
• excellent ability to communicate in both written and spoken English, knowledge of Russian is advantageous;
• strong scientific motivation, and interest in climate change issues as well as Earth system science;
• hands-on and curiosity-driven, and ability to work independently;
• highly skilled in objected-oriented coding (preferably Python);
• affinity with field work in remote (arctic-boreal) locations;
• good social skills.

Further particulars
The appointment will initially be for 1 year. After satisfactory evaluation of the initial appointment, it will be extended for a total duration of 3 years. Planned project start is November 1st, 2018 or soon after.

You can find information about our excellent fringe benefits of employment at www.workingatvu.nl like:
• remuneration of 8,3% end-of-year bonus and 8% holiday allowance
• solid pension scheme (ABP);
• a minimum of 29 holidays in case of full-time employment;
• generous contribution commuting allowance based on public transport;
• discounts on collective insurances (healthcare- and car insurance);
• a wide range of sports facilities which staff may use at a modest charge.

Salary
We offer a competitive salary package in accordance with university regulations for academic personnel, in the position of researcher in salary scale 10, ranging from a minimum of €2640 gross per month up to a maximum of €3303 gross per month based on fulltime employment.

Information
For additional information please contact Sander Veraverbeke by email at s.s.n.veraverbeke@vu.nl
(website: https://sites.google.com/view/sanderveraverbeke/fires-pushing-trees-north). Responses may be slower between July 20 and August 17.

Application
Applicants should send a cover letter with their motivation (maximum 1 page), a research proposal (maximum 2 pages), and CV, as well as the names and contact details of two references before October 1st to f.bosse@vu.nl with the vacancy number in the subject. In the non-binding research proposal applicants should outline what they see as high priority research topics for this position.

Vacancy number: 18273

PHD POSITION IN CARBON EMISSIONS FROM ARCTIC-BOREAL FIRES


Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam is a leading, innovative and growing university that is at the heart of society and actively contributes to new developments in teaching and research. Our university has ten faculties which span a wide range of disciplines, as well as several institutes, foundations, research centres, and support services. Its campus is located in the fastest-growing economic region in the Netherlands (the Zuidas district of Amsterdam), and provides work for over 4,500 staff and scientific education for more than 23,000 students.
At the department of Earth Sciences, we study our dynamic planet from nano- to planetary scale. We quantify the key cycles and interactions in system Earth over timescales from seconds to millions of years by combining fieldwork, lab work and computer simulations. By bringing to bear our fundamental understanding of system Earth and our fresh curiosity we conduct research that is relevant for today’s societal challenges including sustainability, climate change and natural hazards. The department’s research facilities are regarded as outstanding, while the department’s international focus fosters national and international collaboration, both contributing to high-quality and high-impact research outcomes.

Project

This vacancy is part of a prestigious Vidi project funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The project will combine field work, remote sensing and statistical modeling to study interactions between climate, vegetation and fire in boreal and arctic systems.

Tasks

The PhD student will estimate carbon emissions from fires and investigate tree recruitment after fires in boreal forests and arctic tundra using a combination of field and remote sensing approaches. Satellite data processing will encompass the entire circumpolar arctic-boreal biomes, and the applicant should therefore be able to handle big datasets efficiently. Field data includes existing and newly acquired data. The applicant should be able to deal with logistical issues and challenging conditions for field campaigns in Siberia. The applicant will closely collaborate with other team members and colleagues, among others from NASA’s Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment. The research should lead to peer-reviewed publications that will be used to write a PhD thesis. The applicant will present the results at national and international conferences, and contribute to teaching courses.

Requirements
• MSc. in earth, ecological or environmental sciences or related field but with proven interest in earth sciences and/or (spatial) ecology;
• excellent ability to communicate in both written and spoken English, knowledge of Russian is advantageous;
• strong scientific motivation, and interest in climate change issues as well as Earth system science;
• hands-on and curiosity-driven, and ability to work independently;
• affinity with objected-oriented coding (preferably Python), GIS and statistical modeling;
• affinity with field work in remote (arctic-boreal) locations;
• good social skills.

Further particulars

The appointment will initially be for 1 year. After satisfactory evaluation of the initial appointment, it will be extended for a total duration of 4 years. Planned project start is November 1st, 2018 or soon after.You can find information about our excellent fringe benefits of employment at www.workingatvu.nl like:
• remuneration of 8,3% end-of-year bonus and 8% holiday allowance
• solid pension scheme (ABP);
• a minimum of 29 holidays in case of full-time employment;
• generous contribution commuting allowance based on public transport;
• discounts on collective insurances (healthcare- and car insurance);
• a wide range of sports facilities which staff may use at a modest charge.

Salary

The salary will be in accordance with university regulations for academic personnel, and ranges from a minimum of € 2266 gross per month up to a maximum of € 2897 gross per month based on fulltime employment (salary scale 85) for a PhD student.

Information

For additional information please contact Sander Veraverbeke by email at s.s.n.veraverbeke@vu.nl
(website: https://sites.google.com/view/sanderveraverbeke/fires-pushing-trees-north). Responses may be slower between July 20 and August 17.

Application

Applicants should send a cover letter with their motivation (maximum 2 pages), CV, and MSc thesis, as well as the names and contact details of two references before October 1st to f.bosse@vu.nl with the vacancy number in the subject.
Vacancy number: 18272

GFMC MEETINGS CALENDAR 2019

,

American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting

10-14 December 2018, Washington, D.C., USA

Session NH23E-0898: Improving Wildfire Predictability via Machine Learning

Tuesday, 11 December 2018

13:40 – 18:00

Walter E Washington Convention Center – Hall A-C (Poster Hall)


Wildfire risks in a human-natural system continuum have become more concerning in the recent years, especially along wildland-urban interfaces and in densely populated and industrial areas. For example, the 2018 Mendocino Complex Fire has become the largest fire in Californian history; and the 2016 Fort McMurray wildfires scaled down Canadian oil production for two months affecting global oil. Meanwhile, wildfires remain one the least predictable perils due to both their aleatory uncertainty component mainly associated with wildfire ignition triggers, and their epistemic uncertainty component reflecting the lack of knowledge about fire fuel availability and its moisture content, physical setting, weather, and variability in climate. This interdisciplinary session covers topics related to wildfire including drivers/triggers, trends and anomalies, detection and monitoring, risk management and assessment, evaluation of socio-economic and ecological impacts. It also illustrates application of numerical modeling, machine learning, remote sensing, and laboratory or field data in this research field.

Primary Convener

Christian Klose (Swiss Re)

Conveners

Son V Nghiem (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology)

Seung Hee Kim (Chapman University)

Nataliya Le Vine (Swiss Re)

Chairs

Amber Jeanine Soja (National Institute of Aerospace)

Jinwon Kim (National Institute of Meteorological Sciences)

OSPA Liaison

Shenyue Jia (Chapman University)

Primary Convener

Christian Klose (Swiss Re)

Conveners

Nataliya Le Vine (Swiss Re)

Amber Jeanine Soja (National Institute of Aerospace)

Claudia Vitolo (ECMWF)

Conference Websitehttps://agu.confex.com/agu/fm18/prelim.cgi/Person/717732

GFMC MEETINGS CALENDAR 2019

6th Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference

29 April to 03 May 2019, Albuquerque, New Mexico (U.S.A.) & Sydney (Australia) & Marseille (France)


The conference theme is Fuels of Today – Fire Behavior of Tomorrow: Understanding Fire Behavior and Fuels for Sound Decision Making and Effective Management.

The 6th International Fire Behavior and Fuels Conference offers a forum where past experience and lessons learned are documented, current work showcased, and emerging ideas/technology presented to provide a strong foundation that will facilitate setting a course to the future that addresses and responds to developing challenges locally, regionally, and globally.

What you can expect from this global conference
Three highly educational, engaging and entertaining events featuring selected keynote addresses,  numerous plenary, concurrent, and poster presentations, several panel discussions, educational and  training workshop opportunities, vendor exhibits/displays, and other special sessions.

Important Dates

  • Call for presentations opens: 15 August 2018
  • Call for papers closing: 31 October 2018
  • Acceptance of presentations and program finalized: 15 December 2018
  • Registration opens: 15 December 2018
  • Papers for proceedings due: 15 March 2019

Conference Website


GFMC MEETINGS CALENDAR 2018

The 2018 Australian Bushfire Building Conference & Community Forum

6-8 September 2018, Leura, New South Wales, Australia

The 4th annual Australian Bushfire Building Conference is 2018’s essential event for building, planning and associated professionals living and working in Australia’s bushfire-prone areas. Building on the success of the award-winning previous events, this year’s conference will be the best yet with a national approach to bushfire building practices, innovations and regulations.

The conference agenda includes:

  • Keynote by NSW Rural Fire Service
  • Analysis of the 2017 California fires that destroyed nearly 10,000 structures
  • Analysis of the 2018 Tathra bushfire and a detailed look at a BAL 29 home that survived the fire
  • Info sessions on updates to Planning For Bushfire Protection, AS3959 and NCC19
  • Breakout sessions by industry with CPD points
  • Expert panel session with Q&A
  • Interactive app with live polling and Q&A capability
  • Industry Expo with leading suppliers of bushfire building solutions
  • Field trip on Thursday Sep 6 to the 2013 fire grounds in the upper & lower Blue Mountains
  • Community Forum & Expo in Springwood on Saturday September 8 (more info)
  • …and lots more. View the draft Conference Program

 Field Trip to Blue Mountains Fire Grounds

In 2018 a field trip around the 2013 Blue Mountains bushfire grounds is included the day before the conference. Led by Blue Mountains architect Nigel Bell, you’ll visit rebuilt homes across various BAL zones.

Overview of Conference and Related Events

Thursday, 6 September 2018
Pre-Conference Field Trip (optional)

Friday, 7 September 2018
Australian Bushfire Building Conference

Saturday, 8 September 2018
Bushfire Building Community Day: Forum & Expo
Blue Mountains Community Hub, 106 Macquarie Rd, Springwood

Conference website
http://bmee.org.au/bushfire-building-conference/

Keep regularly updated with announcements on speakers and the programat
@facebook.com/bushfirebuildingconference

GFMC MEETINGS CALENDAR 2018

,

ThinkForest Event on the Role of Bioeconomy in Controlling Forest Fires
Preparing for the Future of Wildland Fire

29 May 2018, Madrid, Spain



Forest fires have become an increasingly important environmental and economic global challenge. In southern Europe, the cumulative effects of global warming, fire-prone landscapes, changes in urbanisation patterns, as well as the lack of perceived value of forests for local populations, create the favourable conditions for catastrophic forest fires. The cost of fire mitigation and control amounts to several billion euros each year, as well as jeopardizes forest policy implementation in Southern Europe.

Currently, most of the forest fire funding, e.g. in the national budgets and EU CAP, is going to fire distinguishing, restoration and afforestation after fires have destroyed forests. However, in recent years, science has advocated for a new vision to address the root causes of forest fires, and put forward long-term cost-effective strategies and measures. These include e.g. shifting the focus towards enhancing the resilience of forests to climate change and enhance resource management to reduce fuel loads in forests. This change can be supported by creating and enhancing the incomes and employment that forest can generate, such as through producing wood products and bioenergy, non-wood products, agroforestry and ecosystem services.

This ThinkForest event helps to provide a better science-policy understanding of the problem of forest fires, as well as discusses the opportunities that forest bioeconomy and new policy incentives and measures, for example, under CAP, could offer.

For update information see:

GFMC MEETINGS CALENDAR 2018

,

At EGU 2018, two dedicated meetings addressing vegetation fires will be held:

 

BG4.2
Interactions between fire, the Earth system and humans across time and space

Convener: Gitta Lasslop

Co-Conveners: Alysha Coppola, Angelica Feurdean, Stijn Hantson, Cristina Santin, Sander Veraverbeke

Fire is a global phenomenon influencing ecosystem patterns, carbon stocks and fluxes, and atmospheric composition, with a large impact on human health, safety and economy. Our understanding on drivers of fire occurrence has considerably improved over the last decades and has highlighted climate, vegetation and humans as key drivers. Considerable uncertainty remains on the relative importance of these drivers and how they vary across spatial and temporal scales. A multiscale assessment of fire behaviour is imperative: climate-fire feedbacks, for example, operate at continental to global scales, whereas vegetation and human interactions with fire may require local/scale approaches. The response of ecosystems to meteorological conditions usually takes place on the short time scale, while adaptation of plant traits to the environment is slow.

There are many pathways in which fire affects the Earth system, one of the most important being its impact on the carbon cycle. Pyrogenic carbon (also known as black carbon, charcoal, soot) is increasingly seen as an important player in the global carbon cycle, although many uncertainties still exist concerning reservoir sizes, and losses and fluxes between land, rivers, the ocean and the atmosphere.

The aim of this session is to improve the understanding of interactions between fire, the Earth system and humans. We invite contributions developing or using remote sensing datasets, in situ observations, charcoal records, laboratory experiments and modelling approaches. We welcome studies that help to improve our understanding of (1) the relative importance of climate, vegetation composition and humans on fire occurrence (frequency and area burned) across spatial and temporal scales (2) the impacts of fire on properties of vegetation (composition, structure and traits), atmosphere and society, (3) feedbacks between fire, vegetation and climate, (4) the role of fire in the carbon cycle, with special focus on the transfer of pyrogenic carbon from terrestrial ecosystems to aquatic environments, as well as its biogeochemical fate in these environments.

Invited speakers:

  • Douglas Morton, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
  • Samuel Abiven, Univ. of Zurich

Details:

http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2018/session/27185

 

NH7.1/SSS13.58
Spatial and temporal patterns of wildfires: models, theory, and reality (co-organized)

Convener: Mário Pereira
Co-Conveners: Ricardo Trigo, Marj Tonini, Nikos Koutsias

Wildfires are the result of a large variety of interacting natural and anthropogenic components, which produce patterns that vary significantly both in space and in time.

In this context, this session will examine models, theory, empirical studies, new and innovative technologies for wildfire research as well as the relation between atmospheric circulation and wildfires.

Research topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Fire detection and monitoring, including remote sensing and innovative technologies for wildfire detection
  • Fire spread models, ranging from case studies to long-term climatological assessments
  • Pre-fire planning and risk management
  • Post-fire assessment: burned area mapping, fire severity and damage (vegetation composition, decrease in forests, loss of biodiversity, soil degradation, alteration of landscape patterns and ecosystem functioning)
  • Post-fire vegetation recovery, including time series satellite data and vegetation phenology
  • Influence of weather and climate/climate change on wildfire activity
  • Fire impacts on the environment, in particular on the atmosphere and human health
  • Relation between wildfires and social and economic changes

The conference will bring together wildfire hazard managers, researchers, and theoreticians.

Details:

http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2018/session/26711

GFMC MEETINGS CALENDAR 2017

,

UK Wildfires Conference 2017 – Wildfire resilience in a UK context
7 – 8  November 2017, Bournemouth, United Kingdom

The Urban Heaths Partnership hosted the UK Wildfire Conference in Dorset for the first time on the 7 and 8 of November 2017 at the Royal Bath Hotel in Bournemouth.

The biennial conference is now overseen by the England and Wales Wildfire Forum (opens in a new window) (EWWF) and the Scottish Wildfire Forum (SWF). It brought together wildfire practitioners from all over the UK and beyond. This year we were joined by our colleagues from the National Fire Protection Association (opens in a new window) (NFPA) in the USA for the first time. They assisted with discussions about Firewise and how to make our homes safer from the threat of wildfires.

The overall theme of the conference was ‘Wildfire resilience in a UK context’. We investigated how to make UK homes, communities and the landscape more wildfire resilient in the future. Climate change predictions suggest that the UK will see more extreme wildfire weather; this conference hoped to make us better prepared should these predictions come true.

UK Wildfire Resilience 2017 booklet (PDF, 1Mb) (opens in a new window)

Contact the team via ukwildfires2017@dorsetcc.gov.uk.

The 2015 UK Wildfire Conference – Wildfire: prevention better than cure – was hosted by the Scottish Wildfire Forum and the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service on 10 and 11 November 2015 at the SFRS College, Cambuslang. The two-day conference was aimed at land-owners and managers, fire and rescue personnel and researchers and policy makers, and brought together international delegates from Europe and the UK to discuss wildfire issues, and share knowledge and experience. View the presentations from the 2015 conference.

Wildfire 2013 was held in Wales, featuring a range of conference sessions, workshops, field trips, equipment demonstrations and networking opportunities for all those involved in the prevention and suppression of wildfires.  The focus was on the practical, informed by the best knowledge and experience from around the world. View the presentations from the 2013 conference.

Conference Website: https://www.dorsetforyou.gov.uk/uk-wildfire-conference